Cinephilia and Beyond

Apr 17

From the archives at UNZ.org: How John Huston Beats the Hollywood Odds by Gregg Kilday in The Saturday Review, January 1981.
“Film critic Andrew Sarris, who once dismissed Huston for ‘coasting on his reputation as a wronged individual with an alibi for every bad movie,’ took the occasion of last year’s American Film Society tribute to Huston to write, ‘What I have always tended to underestimate in Huston was how deep in his guts he could feel the universal experience of pointlessness and failure.’ John Huston still doesn’t like to admit that he works very hard. And in between visitors and phone calls at the Beverly Hills Hotel, he talks about heading back to Mexico for a stay before he has to settle down to complete the final cut of ‘Escape to Victory’ and begin all the preproduction meetings on ‘Annie.’ But although he cultivates his standing as a grasshopper, he is as shrewd as any ant. Actor Dennis Morgan once said of Huston, ‘John, I think, wrote his life as a script when he was very young, and he has played it ever since.’”
For more, see our archive under the tag, “John Huston.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//

From the archives at UNZ.org: How John Huston Beats the Hollywood Odds by Gregg Kilday in The Saturday Review, January 1981.

“Film critic Andrew Sarris, who once dismissed Huston for ‘coasting on his reputation as a wronged individual with an alibi for every bad movie,’ took the occasion of last year’s American Film Society tribute to Huston to write, ‘What I have always tended to underestimate in Huston was how deep in his guts he could feel the universal experience of pointlessness and failure.’ John Huston still doesn’t like to admit that he works very hard. And in between visitors and phone calls at the Beverly Hills Hotel, he talks about heading back to Mexico for a stay before he has to settle down to complete the final cut of ‘Escape to Victory’ and begin all the preproduction meetings on ‘Annie.’ But although he cultivates his standing as a grasshopper, he is as shrewd as any ant. Actor Dennis Morgan once said of Huston, ‘John, I think, wrote his life as a script when he was very young, and he has played it ever since.’”

For more, see our archive under the tag, “John Huston.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

[video]

Apr 16

[video]

Film archive British Pathé has released its entire collection to YouTube, making more than 85,000 rare 20th Century videos available to the public. History enthusiasts are now able to browse more than 3,500 hours of some of the most significant moments of the last century. Included in the vast release is unique footage of both World Wars, the Titantic, boxing legend Muhammed Ali and England’s glorious 1966 World Cup victory over Germany.

British Pathé says the films, which span from 1896 to 1976, cover every aspect of global culture and news. The archive’s general manager, Alastair White, told Sky News: “British Pathé is considered to be the finest news reel archive in the world. We decided to publish our entire archive to YouTube to ensure the maximum number of people can enjoy viewing British Pathé films.” The YouTube channel has been set up in collaboration with the German company Mediakraft Networks, an online television network.

Although the videos were previously available on the British Pathé website, it is the first time they have been made accessible for browsing and sharing. In a joint statement, British Pathé and Mediakraft said the project was set up to allow students, teachers and journalists to view, share and embed the high-resolution videos. It said the footage “paints vivid pictures of almost forgotten lifestyles, peculiar technical inventions and everyday life that British Pathé presented in newsreels, cinemagazines, and documentaries.” —British Pathé Publishes Archive On YouTube

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
//

Film archive British Pathé has released its entire collection to YouTube, making more than 85,000 rare 20th Century videos available to the public. History enthusiasts are now able to browse more than 3,500 hours of some of the most significant moments of the last century. Included in the vast release is unique footage of both World Wars, the Titantic, boxing legend Muhammed Ali and England’s glorious 1966 World Cup victory over Germany.

British Pathé says the films, which span from 1896 to 1976, cover every aspect of global culture and news. The archive’s general manager, Alastair White, told Sky News: “British Pathé is considered to be the finest news reel archive in the world. We decided to publish our entire archive to YouTube to ensure the maximum number of people can enjoy viewing British Pathé films.” The YouTube channel has been set up in collaboration with the German company Mediakraft Networks, an online television network.

Although the videos were previously available on the British Pathé website, it is the first time they have been made accessible for browsing and sharing. In a joint statement, British Pathé and Mediakraft said the project was set up to allow students, teachers and journalists to view, share and embed the high-resolution videos. It said the footage “paints vivid pictures of almost forgotten lifestyles, peculiar technical inventions and everyday life that British Pathé presented in newsreels, cinemagazines, and documentaries.” —British Pathé Publishes Archive On YouTube

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Our friends at No Film School posted a great lecture with Richard Linklater: “Richard Linklater is a DIY filmmaker hero for many reasons. He’s self-taught, completely obsessed with cinema and making films, and his approach to telling stories is one that I think many can relate to. And if you were just thinking about what an experience it would be to actually be able to sit in a room and pick his brain about all of this, you’re in luck. Linklater answers a bunch of questions from a small group of folks for one of Fox Searchlight’s Searchlab lectures, which gives us an inside look into how the director goes about writing screenplays, rehearsing with actors, and working on-set. The lecture is about 40 minutes long, so if you don’t have enough time to check out the videos below, scroll down for a few takeaways that I found particularly helpful for my own screenwriting/filmmaking endeavors.” —V Renée, NFS

Spend a week in rehearsal, save a day in production
Linklater spends 3 weeks rehearsing scenes with his actors on every project he does. He does this for several reasons: discovering new things about the project through this creative collaboration and preparing not only the actors, but himself for production. But one benefit to rehearsal he mentions is that every week you spend in rehearsal saves a day in production, and since, as he says, rehearsing is free, that could mean saving a lot of money in the end.
The director in you must fire the writer in you
Ask any screenwriter and they’ll tell you that they never actually finish a screenplay, they just kind of — give up. They relent. I’m sure most of us could spend the rest of our lives rewriting and refining our stories, but if you’re planning on directing the script you’re writing, Linklater says that the writer in you who fell in love with the words and ideas on the page has to eventually concede to the director in you who needs to find out what works on-screen.
Write your screenplay like you would run the 10,000m — one lap at a time
Not all writers do things the same way. Some can sit down and bang out a script on the first try — I don’t happen to know any, but I do know they exist. Some Most writers, however, need quite a bit of prep before they ever write a single word of dialog. Though he says that your approach to screenwriting should be “loose,” Linklater suggests approaching each story element, the characters, the structure, etc., like you would if it were a long distance run around a track — in laps. So, for example, determining who your characters are, their backgrounds, their goals, and everything else would be one lap. This helps organize each piece in your mind, which helps with keeping your sanity, but it also helps to keep you focused on the goal without feeling overwhelmed at how far you have left to go. One lap at a time.
Click here for more articles by V Renée.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

Our friends at No Film School posted a great lecture with Richard Linklater: “Richard Linklater is a DIY filmmaker hero for many reasons. He’s self-taught, completely obsessed with cinema and making films, and his approach to telling stories is one that I think many can relate to. And if you were just thinking about what an experience it would be to actually be able to sit in a room and pick his brain about all of this, you’re in luck. Linklater answers a bunch of questions from a small group of folks for one of Fox Searchlight’s Searchlab lectures, which gives us an inside look into how the director goes about writing screenplays, rehearsing with actors, and working on-set. The lecture is about 40 minutes long, so if you don’t have enough time to check out the videos below, scroll down for a few takeaways that I found particularly helpful for my own screenwriting/filmmaking endeavors.” —V Renée, NFS

Spend a week in rehearsal, save a day in production

Linklater spends 3 weeks rehearsing scenes with his actors on every project he does. He does this for several reasons: discovering new things about the project through this creative collaboration and preparing not only the actors, but himself for production. But one benefit to rehearsal he mentions is that every week you spend in rehearsal saves a day in production, and since, as he says, rehearsing is free, that could mean saving a lot of money in the end.

The director in you must fire the writer in you

Ask any screenwriter and they’ll tell you that they never actually finish a screenplay, they just kind of — give up. They relent. I’m sure most of us could spend the rest of our lives rewriting and refining our stories, but if you’re planning on directing the script you’re writing, Linklater says that the writer in you who fell in love with the words and ideas on the page has to eventually concede to the director in you who needs to find out what works on-screen.

Write your screenplay like you would run the 10,000m — one lap at a time

Not all writers do things the same way. Some can sit down and bang out a script on the first try — I don’t happen to know any, but I do know they exist. Some Most writers, however, need quite a bit of prep before they ever write a single word of dialog. Though he says that your approach to screenwriting should be “loose,” Linklater suggests approaching each story element, the characters, the structure, etc., like you would if it were a long distance run around a track — in laps. So, for example, determining who your characters are, their backgrounds, their goals, and everything else would be one lap. This helps organize each piece in your mind, which helps with keeping your sanity, but it also helps to keep you focused on the goal without feeling overwhelmed at how far you have left to go. One lap at a time.

Click here for more articles by V Renée.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 15

[video]

[video]

The official poster for the 67th Cannes Film Festival pays homage to Marcello Mastroianni and Federico Fellini.
Hervé Chigioni and his graphic designer Gilles Frappier have based the poster design for the 67th Festival de Cannes on a photogram taken from Federico Fellini’s ‘8½,’ which was presented in the Official Selection in 1963. “In Marcello Mastroianni and Federico Fellini, we celebrate a cinema that is free and open to the world, acknowledging once again the artistic importance of Italian and European cinema through one of its most stellar figures.” “The way he looks at us above his black glasses draws us right in to a promise of global cinematographic happiness,” explains the poster’s designer. “The happiness of experiencing the Festival de Cannes together.”

In his films, Marcello Mastroianni continued to encapsulate everything that was most innovative, nonconformist and poetic about cinema. On seeing the poster for the first time, Chiara Mastroianni, the actor’s daughter, said simply: “I am very proud and touched that Cannes has chosen to pay tribute to my father with this poster. I find it very beautiful and modern, with a sweet irony and a classy sense of detachment. It’s really him through and through!” The Festival de Cannes thanks Gaumont, which owns the rights to the film. The 2014 Festival poster was designed by Lagency / Taste, Paris. The graphic charter of the 2014 Festival was designed by Bronx, Paris. —The 67th Festival poster
The 67th Cannes Film Festival takes place from May 14-25. The Official Selection will be unveiled on Thursday, April 17, in a highly anticipated press conference.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

The official poster for the 67th Cannes Film Festival pays homage to Marcello Mastroianni and Federico Fellini.

Hervé Chigioni and his graphic designer Gilles Frappier have based the poster design for the 67th Festival de Cannes on a photogram taken from Federico Fellini’s ‘,’ which was presented in the Official Selection in 1963. “In Marcello Mastroianni and Federico Fellini, we celebrate a cinema that is free and open to the world, acknowledging once again the artistic importance of Italian and European cinema through one of its most stellar figures.” “The way he looks at us above his black glasses draws us right in to a promise of global cinematographic happiness,” explains the poster’s designer. “The happiness of experiencing the Festival de Cannes together.”

In his films, Marcello Mastroianni continued to encapsulate everything that was most innovative, nonconformist and poetic about cinema. On seeing the poster for the first time, Chiara Mastroianni, the actor’s daughter, said simply: “I am very proud and touched that Cannes has chosen to pay tribute to my father with this poster. I find it very beautiful and modern, with a sweet irony and a classy sense of detachment. It’s really him through and through!” The Festival de Cannes thanks Gaumont, which owns the rights to the film.
 
The 2014 Festival poster was designed by Lagency / Taste, Paris. The graphic charter of the 2014 Festival was designed by Bronx, Paris. —The 67th Festival poster

The 67th Cannes Film Festival takes place from May 14-25. The Official Selection will be unveiled on Thursday, April 17, in a highly anticipated press conference.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 14

[video]

From the archives at UNZ.org: Francis Coppola’s Biggest Gamble, July 1981 article in ‘Saturday Review’ on making ‘One from the Heart.’ This awesome article is as much about the film as it is about his ambitious Zoetrope Studios project. Great read. [thanks to Larry Wright]

The making of Francis Ford Coppola’s ‘One From The Heart’ dates from 1982 and shows in detail the conception of the characters and the sets and the insane methods and technological experiments by which they were brought to the screen.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

From the archives at UNZ.org: Francis Coppola’s Biggest Gamble, July 1981 article in ‘Saturday Review’ on making ‘One from the Heart.’ This awesome article is as much about the film as it is about his ambitious Zoetrope Studios project. Great read. [thanks to Larry Wright]

The making of Francis Ford Coppola’s ‘One From The Heart’ dates from 1982 and shows in detail the conception of the characters and the sets and the insane methods and technological experiments by which they were brought to the screen.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 13

[video]

[video]

[video]

Apr 12

[video]