Cinephilia and Beyond

Apr 10

Christopher McQuarrie on filmmaking: “McQuarrie along with his composer Joe Kraemer sit down to discuss some of their thoughts on filmmaking and motivations on certain scenes. Stick through until the end to find out the lessons McQuarrie learned from making his directorial debut.” —filmschoolthrucommentaries

Do you feel like working in the movie business is like working at the top floor of a building where the bottom floor is on fire?Yes. Definitely. None of this is to say that you can’t do it and keep your soul. But, God, if I knew differently, if anybody had explained it to me… It’s why I do interviews the way I do: I’m trying to send a message in a bottle to whoever was me 20 years ago, to take a different view. Whatever you think the business is, it isn’t. And however important you think those early meetings are, they’re not. All that’s ever really going to matter, the only thing that’s ever going to be a commodity, is you and your script. Because if everybody could write screenplays, they would. Everybody thinks they’ve got a great story to tell. Everybody and their mother. If executives could do away with us, they would. If actors could do away with us, they would. And the writers that I see who are the most frustrated are the writers who cannot revel in the fact that the real pleasure of being a writer is: you’d love to get rid of me and can’t. I’m the nerd at the party. But I drove. Nobody’s getting home without my car! —Christopher McQuarrie Career Interview
For more, see our archive under the tag, “Christopher McQuarrie.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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Christopher McQuarrie on filmmaking: “McQuarrie along with his composer Joe Kraemer sit down to discuss some of their thoughts on filmmaking and motivations on certain scenes. Stick through until the end to find out the lessons McQuarrie learned from making his directorial debut.” —filmschoolthrucommentaries

Do you feel like working in the movie business is like working at the top floor of a building where the bottom floor is on fire?
Yes. Definitely. None of this is to say that you can’t do it and keep your soul. But, God, if I knew differently, if anybody had explained it to me… It’s why I do interviews the way I do: I’m trying to send a message in a bottle to whoever was me 20 years ago, to take a different view. Whatever you think the business is, it isn’t. And however important you think those early meetings are, they’re not. All that’s ever really going to matter, the only thing that’s ever going to be a commodity, is you and your script. Because if everybody could write screenplays, they would. Everybody thinks they’ve got a great story to tell. Everybody and their mother. If executives could do away with us, they would. If actors could do away with us, they would. And the writers that I see who are the most frustrated are the writers who cannot revel in the fact that the real pleasure of being a writer is: you’d love to get rid of me and can’t. I’m the nerd at the party. But I drove. Nobody’s getting home without my car! —Christopher McQuarrie Career Interview

For more, see our archive under the tag, “Christopher McQuarrie.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 09

[video]

‘Kubrick Country’ by Penelope Houston, an interview on ‘A Clockwork Orange,’ Saturday Review, 25 December 1971. [thanks to Larry Wright]

This website is intended to provide an extensive free library of written content to everyone on the Internet, eventually containing a comprehensive collection of high-quality books and periodical issues. Since all this content is intended to be permanently and transparently available, students, academics, and journalists may freely use this valuable content, perhaps producing additional writings hyperlinked to these important source materials. This content is provided, in part, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.
A written index for a book or a periodical is merely the precursor of a search-engine; a footnote in a book or article is merely the precursor of a hyperlink. This website might ultimately allow an unlimited amount of previously produced written content to be easily enhanced with these new capabilities.
Sincerely,Ron Unz, ChairmanUNZ.org



A great quote from Stanley Kubrick I read today. So great, in fact, that I made a basic image macro for it: pic.twitter.com/DRM0dsdFaH
— Larry Wright (@refocusedmedia) April 10, 2014




For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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Kubrick Country’ by Penelope Houston, an interview on ‘A Clockwork Orange,’ Saturday Review, 25 December 1971. [thanks to Larry Wright]


This website is intended to provide an extensive free library of written content to everyone on the Internet, eventually containing a comprehensive collection of high-quality books and periodical issues. Since all this content is intended to be permanently and transparently available, students, academics, and journalists may freely use this valuable content, perhaps producing additional writings hyperlinked to these important source materials. This content is provided, in part, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

A written index for a book or a periodical is merely the precursor of a search-engine; a footnote in a book or article is merely the precursor of a hyperlink. This website might ultimately allow an unlimited amount of previously produced written content to be easily enhanced with these new capabilities.

Sincerely,
Ron Unz, Chairman
UNZ.org

A great quote from Stanley Kubrick I read today. So great, in fact, that I made a basic image macro for it: pic.twitter.com/DRM0dsdFaH

— Larry Wright (@refocusedmedia) April 10, 2014

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

[video]

Apr 08

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“Western towns controlled by outlaws. Cigar-chewing heroes in looming close-ups. Operatic showdowns. Throbbing music. Movie buffs know the trademark elements of the great Italian filmmaker, Sergio Leone, by heart, but the engaging documentary ‘Sergio Leone: The Way I See Things’ will surely give even the most ardent fan new insights into this unique master. The maestro behind such genre epics as ‘A Fistful of Dollars,’ ‘The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly’ and ‘Once Upon a Time in the West,’ Leone (1929-1989) was a superb stylist who took the American Westerns he loved as a kid and transformed them into visual arias all of his own, in the process influencing such directors as Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez. Just as fascinating as his films, Leone’s larger-than-life personality is profiled here in an illuminating journey, rich in both anecdotes and gorgeous clips from his movies.
By examining Leone’s superb use of image, sound and the frame, the film reveals the magic and the rough beauty of his arid vistas and outsized characters. Actors Eli Wallach and Claudia Cardinale, directors Giuliano Montaldo and Vittorio Giacci and historian Christopher Frayling, among others, offer invaluable contributions to Giulio Reale’s exhilarating ‘Sergio Leone: The Way I See I Things,’ a mesmerizing portrait that makes us look at an old master with fresh eyes.” —Fernando F. Croce

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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“Western towns controlled by outlaws. Cigar-chewing heroes in looming close-ups. Operatic showdowns. Throbbing music. Movie buffs know the trademark elements of the great Italian filmmaker, Sergio Leone, by heart, but the engaging documentary ‘Sergio Leone: The Way I See Things’ will surely give even the most ardent fan new insights into this unique master. The maestro behind such genre epics as ‘A Fistful of Dollars,’ ‘The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly’ and ‘Once Upon a Time in the West,’ Leone (1929-1989) was a superb stylist who took the American Westerns he loved as a kid and transformed them into visual arias all of his own, in the process influencing such directors as Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez. Just as fascinating as his films, Leone’s larger-than-life personality is profiled here in an illuminating journey, rich in both anecdotes and gorgeous clips from his movies.

By examining Leone’s superb use of image, sound and the frame, the film reveals the magic and the rough beauty of his arid vistas and outsized characters. Actors Eli Wallach and Claudia Cardinale, directors Giuliano Montaldo and Vittorio Giacci and historian Christopher Frayling, among others, offer invaluable contributions to Giulio Reale’s exhilarating ‘Sergio Leone: The Way I See I Things,’ a mesmerizing portrait that makes us look at an old master with fresh eyes.” —Fernando F. Croce

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 07

[video]

[video]

[video]

Apr 06

“Syndicated newspaper column written about three weeks after ‘The Shining’ opened in the U.S. Like most of Stanley Kubrick’s films, the initial critical reaction was very mixed. While the film had its proponents, most of the reviews derided the film for being banal, slow, and too loosely adapted from Stephen King’s novel. While opinions still vary on the film, and debate still rages about the relative merits of the book versus the film, ‘The Shining’ has cemented a place for itself among the classics of modern cinema, and is still being talked about nearly thirty-five years after its release.” —The Overlook Hotel: ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick’s Masterpiece of Modern Horror
Below: continuity Polaroids offer a glimpse into an unused scene from ‘The Shining.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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“Syndicated newspaper column written about three weeks after ‘The Shining’ opened in the U.S. Like most of Stanley Kubrick’s films, the initial critical reaction was very mixed. While the film had its proponents, most of the reviews derided the film for being banal, slow, and too loosely adapted from Stephen King’s novel. While opinions still vary on the film, and debate still rages about the relative merits of the book versus the film, ‘The Shining’ has cemented a place for itself among the classics of modern cinema, and is still being talked about nearly thirty-five years after its release.” —The Overlook Hotel: ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick’s Masterpiece of Modern Horror

Below: continuity Polaroids offer a glimpse into an unused scene from ‘The Shining.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Scorsese’s risk takers: legendary director, Martin Scorsese, discusses some of cinema’s greatest risk-takers. Director: Rob Gilbert (Rooster/NY for Fast Company, original air date: November 21, 2011). Thanks to Larry Wright for sharing the Vimeo links.
Chuck Tatum, ‘Ace in the Hole’

Orson Welles, ‘Citizen Kane’

Roberto Rosellini, ‘My Voyage to Italy’

Powell and Pressburger

John Cassavetes

Robert Altman

William Friese-Greene

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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Scorsese’s risk takers: legendary director, Martin Scorsese, discusses some of cinema’s greatest risk-takers. Director: Rob Gilbert (Rooster/NY for Fast Company, original air date: November 21, 2011). Thanks to Larry Wright for sharing the Vimeo links.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

“Well, I don’t have to tell you that we weren’t trying to write a screenplay that was perfectly-structured. We were just trying to make it make sense. I remember, even without Roman, the first structural question, which may seem absurd now after the fact, was the question of which revelation comes first, the incest or the water scandal? And of course, it was the water scandal. When I realized that, I realized how foolish it was even to have asked the question. But the water scandal was the plot, essentially, and the subplot was the incest. That was the underbelly, and the two were intimately connected, literally and metaphorically: raping the future and raping the land. So it was a really good plot/subplot with a really strong connection. In the first draft, as I recall, it was pretty much a single point-of-view. And in the second draft I tried changing that for purposes of clarification and I think in the end, that’s what made the second draft weaker than the first draft. It’s one of the very, very few detective movies, including ‘The Maltese Falcon,’ which has a singular point-of-view.” —Robert Towne looks back on Chinatown’s 35th anniversary

“In fact, before you set out to write your beat sheet, consider this: one of the most ‘perfect’ screenplays ever written is ‘Chinatown.’ It has been analyzed thousands and thousands of times in screenwriting classes and textbooks. However, the first draft of ‘Chinatown’ was 178 pages long; screenwriter Robert Towne took 9 months to finish it saying that ‘… the writing of it was just tough: writing scenario, after scenario, after scenario was just so complicated that after a certain point, I thought I’d never get through it.’ Producer Robert Evans called the first draft brilliant but incomprehensible, and even Towne himself admitted that if the first draft had been shot, ‘it would have been a mess.’ That ‘perfect beat sheet’ that appears in screenplay books only emerged after a long process of restructuring, revision and clarification. (See LA Times Article on the director/writer/producer collaboration in ‘Chinatown.’)” —Sean Hood, Writing The Feature Script: Week Three — The Treatment
Download the ‘Chinatown’ Step Sheet. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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“Well, I don’t have to tell you that we weren’t trying to write a screenplay that was perfectly-structured. We were just trying to make it make sense. I remember, even without Roman, the first structural question, which may seem absurd now after the fact, was the question of which revelation comes first, the incest or the water scandal? And of course, it was the water scandal. When I realized that, I realized how foolish it was even to have asked the question. But the water scandal was the plot, essentially, and the subplot was the incest. That was the underbelly, and the two were intimately connected, literally and metaphorically: raping the future and raping the land. So it was a really good plot/subplot with a really strong connection. In the first draft, as I recall, it was pretty much a single point-of-view. And in the second draft I tried changing that for purposes of clarification and I think in the end, that’s what made the second draft weaker than the first draft. It’s one of the very, very few detective movies, including ‘The Maltese Falcon,’ which has a singular point-of-view.” —Robert Towne looks back on Chinatown’s 35th anniversary

“In fact, before you set out to write your beat sheet, consider this: one of the most ‘perfect’ screenplays ever written is ‘Chinatown.’ It has been analyzed thousands and thousands of times in screenwriting classes and textbooks. However, the first draft of ‘Chinatown’ was 178 pages long; screenwriter Robert Towne took 9 months to finish it saying that ‘… the writing of it was just tough: writing scenario, after scenario, after scenario was just so complicated that after a certain point, I thought I’d never get through it.’ Producer Robert Evans called the first draft brilliant but incomprehensible, and even Towne himself admitted that if the first draft had been shot, ‘it would have been a mess.’ That ‘perfect beat sheet’ that appears in screenplay books only emerged after a long process of restructuring, revision and clarification. (See LA Times Article on the director/writer/producer collaboration in ‘Chinatown.’)” —Sean Hood, Writing The Feature Script: Week Three — The Treatment

Download the ‘Chinatown’ Step Sheet. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

[video]