Cinephilia and Beyond

Apr 24

Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond on blockbusters in the 1970s. H/T Philip Concannon.
The Writers Guild Foundation released a phenomenal conversation with Billy Wilder.

More filmmaking wisdom from Billy Wilder: excerpts from a 1986 appearance by Wilder at the American Film Institute.


Writing is very hard work, and having done both writing and directing, I tell you that directing is a pleasure and writing is a drag. Directing can become difficult, but it is a pleasure because you have something to work with. You can put the camera here or there, you can interpret the scene this way or that way, the readings can be such or such. But writing is just an empty page—you start with absolutely nothing. I think writers are vastly underrated and underpaid. It’s totally impossible to make a great picture out of a lousy script. It’s impossible, though, for a mediocre director to completely screw up a great script.


For more, see our archive under the tag, “Billy Wilder.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond on blockbusters in the 1970s. H/T Philip Concannon.

The Writers Guild Foundation released a phenomenal conversation with Billy Wilder.

More filmmaking wisdom from Billy Wilder: excerpts from a 1986 appearance by Wilder at the American Film Institute.


Writing is very hard work, and having done both writing and directing, I tell you that directing is a pleasure and writing is a drag. Directing can become difficult, but it is a pleasure because you have something to work with. You can put the camera here or there, you can interpret the scene this way or that way, the readings can be such or such. But writing is just an empty page—you start with absolutely nothing. I think writers are vastly underrated and underpaid. It’s totally impossible to make a great picture out of a lousy script. It’s impossible, though, for a mediocre director to completely screw up a great script.

For more, see our archive under the tag, “Billy Wilder.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

On MetaFilter, user Going To Maine compiled a list of thirty Errol Morris documentaries, TV episodes, short subjects and two movies about documentary legend, all of which can be streamed on YouTube, along with some short descriptions of their content. Photo by Nubar Alexanian. H/T Aphelis.
‘Gates of Heaven’ (1978) — A documentary about pet cemeteries (Wikipedia). Werner Herzog vowed to eat his shoe if the film was completed and shown in a public theater. It was and he did
‘The Thin Blue Line’ (1988) — A documentary about the wrongful conviction of Randall Dale Adams. The documentary resulted in Adams’s case being re-assessed and his eventually being released (Wikipedia)
‘A Brief History of Time’ (1991) — A documentary about Stephen Hawking (Wikipedia)
‘Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter, Jr.’ (1999) — A documentary about Fred A. Leuchter, Jr., an electric chair technician, holocaust denier, and practitioner of a “death row shakedown” (Wikipedia)
‘A Brief History of Errol Morris’ (2000) — A documentary about Errol Morris by Kevin Macdonald
‘First Person’ (TV Series, 2000-2001)
‘Mr. Debt’ — An interview with Andrew Capoccia, a (now disbarred) lawyer for folks carrying credit-card debt
‘Eyeball to Eyeball’ — An interview with Clyde Roper
‘Stairway to Heaven’ — An interview with Temple Grandin
‘The Killer Inside Me’ — An interview with Sondra London
‘I Dismember Mama’ — An interview with Saul Kent
‘The Stalker’ — An interview with Bill Kinsley, employer of postal worker Thomas McIlvane
‘The Parrot’ — A documentary about the murder of Jane Gill, possibly witnessed by a parrot
‘In the Kingdom of the Unabomber’ — An interview with pen-pal of Ted Kaczynski
‘You’re Soaking In It’ — An interview with crime scene cleaner Joan Dougherty
‘Mr. Personality’ — An interview with Dr. Michael Stone, Columbia University forensic psychologist and host of ‘Most Evil’
‘The Only Truth’ — An interview with mob lawyer Murray Richman
‘Harvesting Me’ — An interview with Josh Harris
‘One in a Million Trillion’ — An interview with Rick Rosner
‘Leaving the Earth’ — An interview with Denny Fitch
‘The Smartest Man in the World’ — An interview with Chris Langan

‘A Short Film About Movies’ (2002) — A short film that played before the 2002 Academy Awards
‘The Fog of War - Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara’ (2003) — An interview with former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara. It won that year’s Oscar for Best Documentary
‘The Nominees’ (2007) — A short film that played before the 2007 Academy Awards
‘Survivors’ — A collection of interviews with Cancer survivors
‘They Were There’ (2011) — A documentary for IBM’s Centennial about the history of the company
‘The Umbrella Man’ (2011) — An Op-Doc for the New York Times, talking with Josiah ‘Tink’ Thompson about the significance of the Umbrella Man
‘Team Spirit’ (2012) — A short documentary for ESPN about sports fans
‘El Wingador’ (2012) — An Op-Doc (with a corresponding article) about Bill Simmons, five-time champion of the Wing Bowl
‘November 22, 1963’ (2013) — A documentary about Josiah ‘Tink’ Thompson and his research into the assassination of JFK
‘The Making of The Thin Blue Line’ — Televised interview with Errol Morris and others about the making of ‘The Thin Blue Line’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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On MetaFilter, user Going To Maine compiled a list of thirty Errol Morris documentaries, TV episodes, short subjects and two movies about documentary legend, all of which can be streamed on YouTube, along with some short descriptions of their content. Photo by Nubar Alexanian. H/T Aphelis.

First Person’ (TV Series, 2000-2001)

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

On April 19 2011, a capacity crowd in the Los Angeles DGA Theater witnessed the meeting of two iconic names in film history: one a living legend, the other an immortal giant. The 75th Anniversary Committee’s ‘Clint Eastwood on the Impact of John Ford’s Stagecoach’ was an informative and engaging evening that analyzed the careers of DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipients Ford and Eastwood — two filmmakers serving as cornerstones of a definitively American film genre, the western.
75th Anniversary Chair Michael Apted welcomed the evening’s moderator, director Paul Schrader (‘American Gigolo’), who introduced ‘Stagecoach’ explaining aspects that make the film a real game-changer: its revitalization of the Western genre, its elevation of the genre to serious adult drama, and the creation of the Western’s prototypical hero in the form of John Wayne. “Anyone would be flattered to be spoken of in the same breath as John Ford,” said a visibly touched Eastwood. “I remember seeing ‘Stagecoach’ as a kid when it first came out. Ford had an influence on me subconsciously and I watched his films in a dark theater with my knees up on the chair in front of me, sometimes twice in a row.” Schrader and Eastwood engaged in a contemplative discussion of key moments ‘Stagecoach’ and the Ford canon. “You can’t be an American director without owing a debt to John Ford,” said Schrader. Eastwood agreed completely, adding that Ford’s work seeps into one’s DNA. “His influence is like osmosis.”

Eastwood noted his own 1992 DGA Award-winning film ‘Unforgiven’ was described upon its release as a eulogy to the Western genre. “When I read that script I thought ‘this would make a perfect last Western.” He also disclosed he felt the real secret of the Western was something that Ford captured completely with ‘Stagecoach’—story. “If you have a shot of the lone man standing there, the question is: where did he come from? There is a story in just that one shot of a lone figure out in the vast land and the audience sees it. As a director, your job is to find that story and tell it— that’s what makes the picture work.” Before the conversation came to a close, Apted stepped in to ask Eastwood “Why was Ford such a game-changer what did he bring to the Western that was so unique?” “There’s something about the way he approached his subject that broke down clichés of the era,” said Eastwood. “I think he was always trying to make social statements in his movies and with ‘Stagecoach’ he used the Western to do it effectively.” —Clint Eastwood on the Impact of John Ford’s Stagecoach, A DGA 75th Anniversary Event
Click on image below for full video coverage of the event (49:35).

I know what I’ll be reading today: Dudley Nichols & Ben Hecht’s screenplay for ‘Stagecoach.’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

A special thanks to Jog Road Productions. Be sure to check out their YouTube channel for more interviews with filmmakers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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On April 19 2011, a capacity crowd in the Los Angeles DGA Theater witnessed the meeting of two iconic names in film history: one a living legend, the other an immortal giant. The 75th Anniversary Committee’s ‘Clint Eastwood on the Impact of John Ford’s Stagecoach’ was an informative and engaging evening that analyzed the careers of DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipients Ford and Eastwood — two filmmakers serving as cornerstones of a definitively American film genre, the western.

75th Anniversary Chair Michael Apted welcomed the evening’s moderator, director Paul Schrader (‘American Gigolo’), who introduced ‘Stagecoach’ explaining aspects that make the film a real game-changer: its revitalization of the Western genre, its elevation of the genre to serious adult drama, and the creation of the Western’s prototypical hero in the form of John Wayne. “Anyone would be flattered to be spoken of in the same breath as John Ford,” said a visibly touched Eastwood. “I remember seeing ‘Stagecoach’ as a kid when it first came out. Ford had an influence on me subconsciously and I watched his films in a dark theater with my knees up on the chair in front of me, sometimes twice in a row.” Schrader and Eastwood engaged in a contemplative discussion of key moments ‘Stagecoach’ and the Ford canon. “You can’t be an American director without owing a debt to John Ford,” said Schrader. Eastwood agreed completely, adding that Ford’s work seeps into one’s DNA. “His influence is like osmosis.”

Eastwood noted his own 1992 DGA Award-winning film ‘Unforgiven’ was described upon its release as a eulogy to the Western genre. “When I read that script I thought ‘this would make a perfect last Western.” He also disclosed he felt the real secret of the Western was something that Ford captured completely with ‘Stagecoach’—story. “If you have a shot of the lone man standing there, the question is: where did he come from? There is a story in just that one shot of a lone figure out in the vast land and the audience sees it. As a director, your job is to find that story and tell it— that’s what makes the picture work.” Before the conversation came to a close, Apted stepped in to ask Eastwood “Why was Ford such a game-changer what did he bring to the Western that was so unique?” “There’s something about the way he approached his subject that broke down clichés of the era,” said Eastwood. “I think he was always trying to make social statements in his movies and with ‘Stagecoach’ he used the Western to do it effectively.” Clint Eastwood on the Impact of John Ford’s Stagecoach, A DGA 75th Anniversary Event

Click on image below for full video coverage of the event (49:35).

I know what I’ll be reading today: Dudley Nichols & Ben Hecht’s screenplay for ‘Stagecoach.’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

A special thanks to Jog Road Productions. Be sure to check out their YouTube channel for more interviews with filmmakers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 23

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I’d like to take a moment and thank wonderful actor and promising director Chris Messina for the greatest compliment Cinephilia & Beyond could possibly get. Encouraged by these kind words, Chris, we promise to do our best to continue growing and evolving.
Read the original article at Indiewire: Meet the 2014 Tribeca Filmmakers #33: Chris Messina On How He Completed ‘Alex of Venice’ While Shooting ‘The Mindy Project’; What’s The Best Film School for Filmmakers (If Any)? Here’s What This Year’s Tribeca Film Festival Filmmakers Say.
“As an actor, Chris Messina is no stranger to the Tribeca Film Festival. He has had major roles in recent festival films (‘Monogamy,’ ‘Fairhaven’ and ‘The Giant Mechanical Man’), but his latest, ‘Alex of Venice,’ represents his first appearance as a director at the event. He does play a role, but it is one that, for narrative purposes, has him absent for most of the film: He plays a husband who decides to take a break from his marriage to the title character, (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), an environmental lawyer living in Venice, Calif. The film looks at how Alex balances the responsibilities of her work, her aging father (Don Johnson, playing a former TV actor) and her son without her husband’s support. In a recent phone interview from his parents’ home in Northport, Long Island, Mr. Messina discussed what it was like on the other side of the lens. Following are excerpts from that conversation.” —Tribeca First-Timers: Chris Messina by Mekado Murphy

Born and raised in New York, Chris Messina began his career on the stage and went on to establish a prolific career as an American film and television actor. He has appeared in such films as ‘Vicky Cristina Barcelona,’ ‘Argo,’ ‘Greenberg,’ and ‘Away We Go.’ He recently wrapped shooting David Gordon Green’s ‘Manglehorn,’ opposite Al Pacino. He is perhaps best known for his TV roles as Reese Lansing in ‘Newsroom,’ Chris Sanchez in ‘Damages,’ and Danny Castellano in ‘The Mindy Project.’ ‘Alex of Venice’ is his directorial debut. —Tribeca Film Festival 2014

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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I’d like to take a moment and thank wonderful actor and promising director Chris Messina for the greatest compliment Cinephilia & Beyond could possibly get. Encouraged by these kind words, Chris, we promise to do our best to continue growing and evolving.

Read the original article at Indiewire: Meet the 2014 Tribeca Filmmakers #33: Chris Messina On How He Completed ‘Alex of Venice’ While Shooting ‘The Mindy Project’; What’s The Best Film School for Filmmakers (If Any)? Here’s What This Year’s Tribeca Film Festival Filmmakers Say.

“As an actor, Chris Messina is no stranger to the Tribeca Film Festival. He has had major roles in recent festival films (‘Monogamy,’ ‘Fairhaven’ and ‘The Giant Mechanical Man’), but his latest, ‘Alex of Venice,’ represents his first appearance as a director at the event. He does play a role, but it is one that, for narrative purposes, has him absent for most of the film: He plays a husband who decides to take a break from his marriage to the title character, (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), an environmental lawyer living in Venice, Calif. The film looks at how Alex balances the responsibilities of her work, her aging father (Don Johnson, playing a former TV actor) and her son without her husband’s support. In a recent phone interview from his parents’ home in Northport, Long Island, Mr. Messina discussed what it was like on the other side of the lens. Following are excerpts from that conversation.” Tribeca First-Timers: Chris Messina by Mekado Murphy

Born and raised in New York, Chris Messina began his career on the stage and went on to establish a prolific career as an American film and television actor. He has appeared in such films as ‘Vicky Cristina Barcelona,’ ‘Argo,’ ‘Greenberg,’ and ‘Away We Go.’ He recently wrapped shooting David Gordon Green’s ‘Manglehorn,’ opposite Al Pacino. He is perhaps best known for his TV roles as Reese Lansing in ‘Newsroom,’ Chris Sanchez in ‘Damages,’ and Danny Castellano in ‘The Mindy Project.’ ‘Alex of Venice’ is his directorial debut. Tribeca Film Festival 2014

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 22

John Cassavetes and Shafi Hadi during the recording of Charles Mingus’ original score to Cassevetes’ 1959 directorial debut film ‘Shadows.’ [ciudadsaudade]
What was Charlie Mingus’ role in the soundtrack for ‘Shadows’?Al Ruban: Mingus worked on a score, but he was more organized than John wanted. And I don’t think that was apparent to John at the beginning. He did all this music, and John loved it, but he really wanted control. John needed to improvise some things because he couldn’t communicate what he wanted to get across. —Out of the Shadows: John Cassavetes

Above: Charles Mingus at the recording session for ‘Shadows.’ Image courtesy photographer Marvin Lichtner.
“In November 1958, John Cassavetes premiered his revolutionary independent film ‘Shadows’ in a series of midnight screenings at the Paris Theater in New York City. Village Voice critic Jonas Mekas immediately proclaimed it a work of genius, calling it ‘the most frontier-breaking American feature in at least a decade.’ Most audience members, including Cassavetes, hated it. Cassavetes reassembled his cast and crew and shot extensive new footage, modifying old scenes and adding new ones. The final version premiered at Amos Vogel’s legendary Cinema 16 on November 11, 1959, and was an overnight critical sensation. One of the myths that propelled ‘Shadows’ to instant notoriety was its improvisational origins. It’s considered by many to be the first ‘true’ cinematic jazz narrative, both for its racially charged subject and its unconventional, unscripted making in the streets of Manhattan. It’s been further celebrated for an original score by one of the all-time jazz greats, Charles Mingus. However much of the legend is deceptive. Little of Mingus’s music appears in the final film. Actual jazz scenes are conspicuously absent. And recent writings by Ray Carney, Tom Charity and others have attempted to debunk or clarify much of the improvisation myth.” —Passing Shadows: Cassavetes And Mingus
Thomas Reichman’s hour-long documentary tribute to the legend below:

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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John Cassavetes and Shafi Hadi during the recording of Charles Mingus’ original score to Cassevetes’ 1959 directorial debut film ‘Shadows.’ [ciudadsaudade]

What was Charlie Mingus’ role in the soundtrack for ‘Shadows’?
Al Ruban: Mingus worked on a score, but he was more organized than John wanted. And I don’t think that was apparent to John at the beginning. He did all this music, and John loved it, but he really wanted control. John needed to improvise some things because he couldn’t communicate what he wanted to get across. Out of the Shadows: John Cassavetes

Above: Charles Mingus at the recording session for ‘Shadows.’ Image courtesy photographer Marvin Lichtner.

“In November 1958, John Cassavetes premiered his revolutionary independent film ‘Shadows’ in a series of midnight screenings at the Paris Theater in New York City. Village Voice critic Jonas Mekas immediately proclaimed it a work of genius, calling it ‘the most frontier-breaking American feature in at least a decade.’ Most audience members, including Cassavetes, hated it. Cassavetes reassembled his cast and crew and shot extensive new footage, modifying old scenes and adding new ones. The final version premiered at Amos Vogel’s legendary Cinema 16 on November 11, 1959, and was an overnight critical sensation. One of the myths that propelled ‘Shadows’ to instant notoriety was its improvisational origins. It’s considered by many to be the first ‘true’ cinematic jazz narrative, both for its racially charged subject and its unconventional, unscripted making in the streets of Manhattan. It’s been further celebrated for an original score by one of the all-time jazz greats, Charles Mingus. However much of the legend is deceptive. Little of Mingus’s music appears in the final film. Actual jazz scenes are conspicuously absent. And recent writings by Ray Carney, Tom Charity and others have attempted to debunk or clarify much of the improvisation myth.” Passing Shadows: Cassavetes And Mingus

Thomas Reichman’s hour-long documentary tribute to the legend below:

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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Apr 21

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Apr 20

More filmmaking wisdom from Frank Darabont: “The man who is known for spending multiple sessions actually recording his commentary tracks returns with more well prepared information on how he threw away all of his trademark film technique out for a much looser style seen in ‘The Mist.’ Hear it all here.” —filmschoolthrucommentaries: Frank Darabont on filmmaking – Part 3 & 4

In the two previous parts: “The man behind the camera of the classic ‘Shawshank Redemption’ illuminates us noobs on the craft of filmmaking. He talks about such topics as directing, narration, sound design, set design, camera technique amongst other topics. Oh, and did you ever wonder about who Allen Greene was and why Frank Darabont dedicated Shawshank Redemption to him? Listen below and find out.” —Frank Darabont on filmmaking

“If I’m any example, it took me nine years of starving, struggling and honing my craft before I started making my living as a writer. Those were lean years, too, believe me. But in the nine years since then, I haven’t stopped working. I consider myself very lucky, but I also believe you can make your own luck by applying the elbow grease of determination and effort, by nurturing a persistent belief in yourself no matter how bleak your chances seem (this philosophy lurks at the very heart of ‘The Shawshank Redemption,’ and is one of the main reasons I fell in love with King’s story).

My standard joke — actually, I’m fairly serious — is that there are potentially more talented writers and directors than I working in shoe stores and Burger Kings across the nation; the difference is I was willing to put in the nine years of effort and they weren’t. More to the point, it took Thomas Edison a thousand attempts before he got that damn light bulb to turn on. Imagine if he’d gotten discouraged enough to quit after only nine hundred and ninety nine tries. The message here is simple, and John F. Kennedy said it best: “We choose to go to the moon not because it is easy, but because it is hard.” Rough translation? If you have a dream, get up off your ass and start putting one foot in front of the other. Me, I’ll take Kennedy and Edison over Beavis and Butt-head any old day.” —Memo from the Trenches by Frank Darabont
“How bad do you want it? Frank Darabont went through it all, can you? Go and do likewise gents.” —Frank Darabont on a career in film

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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More filmmaking wisdom from Frank Darabont: “The man who is known for spending multiple sessions actually recording his commentary tracks returns with more well prepared information on how he threw away all of his trademark film technique out for a much looser style seen in ‘The Mist.’ Hear it all here.” filmschoolthrucommentaries: Frank Darabont on filmmaking – Part 3 & 4

In the two previous parts: “The man behind the camera of the classic ‘Shawshank Redemption’ illuminates us noobs on the craft of filmmaking. He talks about such topics as directing, narration, sound design, set design, camera technique amongst other topics. Oh, and did you ever wonder about who Allen Greene was and why Frank Darabont dedicated Shawshank Redemption to him? Listen below and find out.” Frank Darabont on filmmaking

“If I’m any example, it took me nine years of starving, struggling and honing my craft before I started making my living as a writer. Those were lean years, too, believe me. But in the nine years since then, I haven’t stopped working. I consider myself very lucky, but I also believe you can make your own luck by applying the elbow grease of determination and effort, by nurturing a persistent belief in yourself no matter how bleak your chances seem (this philosophy lurks at the very heart of ‘The Shawshank Redemption,’ and is one of the main reasons I fell in love with King’s story).

My standard joke — actually, I’m fairly serious — is that there are potentially more talented writers and directors than I working in shoe stores and Burger Kings across the nation; the difference is I was willing to put in the nine years of effort and they weren’t. More to the point, it took Thomas Edison a thousand attempts before he got that damn light bulb to turn on. Imagine if he’d gotten discouraged enough to quit after only nine hundred and ninety nine tries. The message here is simple, and John F. Kennedy said it best: “We choose to go to the moon not because it is easy, but because it is hard.” Rough translation? If you have a dream, get up off your ass and start putting one foot in front of the other. Me, I’ll take Kennedy and Edison over Beavis and Butt-head any old day.” Memo from the Trenches by Frank Darabont

“How bad do you want it? Frank Darabont went through it all, can you? Go and do likewise gents.” Frank Darabont on a career in film

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Founded in 2000, the DGA’s Visual History Program has conducted more than 160 interviews with directors and director’s team members discussing their careers and creative processes in film, television and other media. The mission of the DGA Visual History Program is to provide DGA members, entertainment industry professionals, educators, students and researchers the opportunity to explore the art and craft of film and television production through the career recollections and reflections of directors and director’s team members, including assistant directors, unit production managers, associate directors and stage managers. By means of in-depth interviews, the collection also offers historical documentation of the evolution of the craft, as well as the history and contributions of the Directors Guild as a social institution for peer interaction, support, and representation of its members’ creative concerns.
Robert Altman is admired as one of the most adventurous and influential American directors of his time, a filmmaker whose iconoclastic career spanned more than five decades of writing and directing in both film and television
Multihyphenate filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich (‘The Last Picture Show,’ ‘Paper Moon’) shares stories from his long career as a director, writer, producer and actor during the ‘New Hollywood’ era

Robert Benton discusses his journey from screenwriting to directing in films like ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ (1967), ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ (1979), and ‘Nobody’s Fool’ (1994). Benton also describes what he learned about working with a cast from actors like Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep, and Paul Newman
Greek-born, naturalized French director Costa-Gavras (‘Z,’ ‘Missing’) discusses his long filmmaking career directing critically acclaimed political and social thrillers. Gavras shares his inspirations for his most well-known films, his working relationships with producers, and where the ‘dash’ in his name originated

As both a writer and director, Jules Dassin was known for his noir films, ‘Thieves’ Highway’ (1949), ‘Brute Force’ (1947) and ‘The Naked City’ (1948), as well as two influential heist films, ‘Rififi’ (1955) and ‘Topkapi’ (1964). He also directed ‘Never on a Sunday’ (1960), which he wrote, produced and starred in alongside his future wife, Melina Mercouri
Miloš Forman was born in Czechoslovakia and grew up during World War II and the era of Soviet domination of his country. He studied screenwriting at the Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts in Prague

Cult classic director Monte Hellman (‘Two-Lane Blacktop,’ ‘The Shooting,’ ‘Ride in the Whirlwind’) discusses his long career directing horror films and westerns and everything in between
Walter Hill talks with Robert Markowitz about starting out as a second assistant director and screenwriter, pursuing his interest in genre films, working with Sam Peckinpah and John Huston, and his first directing job on ‘Hard Times’ with Charles Bronson

Barry Levinson (‘Rain Man,’ ‘The Natural,’ ‘Diner’) reflects on his first big break on the local Los Angeles comedy show, ‘Lohman and Barkley,’ his early apprenticeship with Mel Brooks as a writer, and his working methods and philosophy, including the importance of improvisation on the set
Jerry Lewis shares his unique perspective of the directing side of more than seven decades working in comedy as a director, writer, producer and performer

Sidney Lumet began his career acting and directing for the theater, and made his screen acting debut in the movie, ‘One Third of a Nation,’ in 1939. This interview was conducted on January 13 and 15, 2004
Indie filmmaker John Sayles began his career writing short stories and novels until he became interested in screenplays and, as a sample to show an agent, adapted the novel ‘Eight Men Out’ into a script (which he eventually directed in 1988)

French director Agnès Varda (‘La Pointe Courte,’ ‘Cléo from 5 to 7,’ ‘The Beaches of Agnès’) discusses her long career creating documentaries, features, and mixtures of the two that pre-dated and inspired several film movements of European cinema
Acclaimed director and cinematographer Haskell Wexler (‘Medium Cool,’ ‘Latino’), discusses what it takes from both roles to bring excellence to features and documentaries
At age nineteen, Robert Wise parlayed his early interest in film into a job in the RKO sound department. Later, he worked as an editor on films like ‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame,’ starring Charles Laughton
Full List of Visual History Interview Collection

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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Founded in 2000, the DGA’s Visual History Program has conducted more than 160 interviews with directors and director’s team members discussing their careers and creative processes in film, television and other media. The mission of the DGA Visual History Program is to provide DGA members, entertainment industry professionals, educators, students and researchers the opportunity to explore the art and craft of film and television production through the career recollections and reflections of directors and director’s team members, including assistant directors, unit production managers, associate directors and stage managers. By means of in-depth interviews, the collection also offers historical documentation of the evolution of the craft, as well as the history and contributions of the Directors Guild as a social institution for peer interaction, support, and representation of its members’ creative concerns.

Full List of Visual History Interview Collection

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Apr 19

1998 DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Francis Ford Coppola was the subject of the Guild’s 75th Anniversary event on March 26, 2011. Coppola, the winner of two DGA Feature Film Awards (‘The Godfather’ and ‘The Godfather Part II’) and multiple nominations (‘The Conversation’; ‘Apocalypse Now’; ‘The Godfather Part III’) was honored at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles. As a producer, Coppola worked to provide young independent filmmakers freedom from studio interference. He was also a pioneer of technological filmmaking advances like pre-visualization, word processing for screenplays, electronic editing and experimentation with high definition. “Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most influential and innovative filmmakers of our time,” said DGA President Taylor Hackford in his welcome. “His work has helped shape contemporary cinema around the world.”

Coppola was joined onstage by directors Paul Thomas Anderson (‘There Will Be Blood’), Catherine Hardwicke (‘Red Riding Hood’) and David O. Russell (‘The Fighter’), for a conversation about the impact his films had on their own careers and others of their generation. Each of the directors presented clips from Coppola’s work to form the basis of their conversation. 75th Anniversary Advisory Committee Chair Michael Apted served as moderator. “Francis’ influence lies not only in the awards he’s won or the films he’s directed, but also in the example he’s set for young directors,” said Apted. Ever humble, the legendary director attributed much of his success to his creative collaborators. “Film is an ensemble,” said Coppola. “You’re the ringleader, but hopefully you have all of this wonderful work coming out of people whom you inspire, but also inspire you.” —The Impact of Francis Ford Coppola on the Next Generation, A DGA 75th Anniversary Event
Click on image below for full video coverage of the DGA 75th Anniversary event honoring Francis Ford Coppola (1:29:57).

A special thanks to Jog Road Productions. Be sure to check out their YouTube channel for more interviews with filmmakers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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1998 DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Francis Ford Coppola was the subject of the Guild’s 75th Anniversary event on March 26, 2011. Coppola, the winner of two DGA Feature Film Awards (‘The Godfather’ and ‘The Godfather Part II’) and multiple nominations (‘The Conversation’; ‘Apocalypse Now’; ‘The Godfather Part III’) was honored at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles. As a producer, Coppola worked to provide young independent filmmakers freedom from studio interference. He was also a pioneer of technological filmmaking advances like pre-visualization, word processing for screenplays, electronic editing and experimentation with high definition. “Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most influential and innovative filmmakers of our time,” said DGA President Taylor Hackford in his welcome. “His work has helped shape contemporary cinema around the world.”

Coppola was joined onstage by directors Paul Thomas Anderson (‘There Will Be Blood’), Catherine Hardwicke (‘Red Riding Hood’) and David O. Russell (‘The Fighter’), for a conversation about the impact his films had on their own careers and others of their generation. Each of the directors presented clips from Coppola’s work to form the basis of their conversation. 75th Anniversary Advisory Committee Chair Michael Apted served as moderator. “Francis’ influence lies not only in the awards he’s won or the films he’s directed, but also in the example he’s set for young directors,” said Apted. Ever humble, the legendary director attributed much of his success to his creative collaborators. “Film is an ensemble,” said Coppola. “You’re the ringleader, but hopefully you have all of this wonderful work coming out of people whom you inspire, but also inspire you.” —The Impact of Francis Ford Coppola on the Next Generation, A DGA 75th Anniversary Event

Click on image below for full video coverage of the DGA 75th Anniversary event honoring Francis Ford Coppola (1:29:57).

A special thanks to Jog Road Productions. Be sure to check out their YouTube channel for more interviews with filmmakers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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