Cinephilia and Beyond

Apr 22

John Cassavetes and Shafi Hadi during the recording of Charles Mingus’ original score to Cassevetes’ 1959 directorial debut film ‘Shadows.’ [ciudadsaudade]
What was Charlie Mingus’ role in the soundtrack for ‘Shadows’?Al Ruban: Mingus worked on a score, but he was more organized than John wanted. And I don’t think that was apparent to John at the beginning. He did all this music, and John loved it, but he really wanted control. John needed to improvise some things because he couldn’t communicate what he wanted to get across. —Out of the Shadows: John Cassavetes

Above: Charles Mingus at the recording session for ‘Shadows.’ Image courtesy photographer Marvin Lichtner.
“In November 1958, John Cassavetes premiered his revolutionary independent film ‘Shadows’ in a series of midnight screenings at the Paris Theater in New York City. Village Voice critic Jonas Mekas immediately proclaimed it a work of genius, calling it ‘the most frontier-breaking American feature in at least a decade.’ Most audience members, including Cassavetes, hated it. Cassavetes reassembled his cast and crew and shot extensive new footage, modifying old scenes and adding new ones. The final version premiered at Amos Vogel’s legendary Cinema 16 on November 11, 1959, and was an overnight critical sensation. One of the myths that propelled ‘Shadows’ to instant notoriety was its improvisational origins. It’s considered by many to be the first ‘true’ cinematic jazz narrative, both for its racially charged subject and its unconventional, unscripted making in the streets of Manhattan. It’s been further celebrated for an original score by one of the all-time jazz greats, Charles Mingus. However much of the legend is deceptive. Little of Mingus’s music appears in the final film. Actual jazz scenes are conspicuously absent. And recent writings by Ray Carney, Tom Charity and others have attempted to debunk or clarify much of the improvisation myth.” —Passing Shadows: Cassavetes And Mingus
Thomas Reichman’s hour-long documentary tribute to the legend below:

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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John Cassavetes and Shafi Hadi during the recording of Charles Mingus’ original score to Cassevetes’ 1959 directorial debut film ‘Shadows.’ [ciudadsaudade]

What was Charlie Mingus’ role in the soundtrack for ‘Shadows’?
Al Ruban: Mingus worked on a score, but he was more organized than John wanted. And I don’t think that was apparent to John at the beginning. He did all this music, and John loved it, but he really wanted control. John needed to improvise some things because he couldn’t communicate what he wanted to get across. Out of the Shadows: John Cassavetes

Above: Charles Mingus at the recording session for ‘Shadows.’ Image courtesy photographer Marvin Lichtner.

“In November 1958, John Cassavetes premiered his revolutionary independent film ‘Shadows’ in a series of midnight screenings at the Paris Theater in New York City. Village Voice critic Jonas Mekas immediately proclaimed it a work of genius, calling it ‘the most frontier-breaking American feature in at least a decade.’ Most audience members, including Cassavetes, hated it. Cassavetes reassembled his cast and crew and shot extensive new footage, modifying old scenes and adding new ones. The final version premiered at Amos Vogel’s legendary Cinema 16 on November 11, 1959, and was an overnight critical sensation. One of the myths that propelled ‘Shadows’ to instant notoriety was its improvisational origins. It’s considered by many to be the first ‘true’ cinematic jazz narrative, both for its racially charged subject and its unconventional, unscripted making in the streets of Manhattan. It’s been further celebrated for an original score by one of the all-time jazz greats, Charles Mingus. However much of the legend is deceptive. Little of Mingus’s music appears in the final film. Actual jazz scenes are conspicuously absent. And recent writings by Ray Carney, Tom Charity and others have attempted to debunk or clarify much of the improvisation myth.” Passing Shadows: Cassavetes And Mingus

Thomas Reichman’s hour-long documentary tribute to the legend below:

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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Apr 21

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Apr 20

More filmmaking wisdom from Frank Darabont: “The man who is known for spending multiple sessions actually recording his commentary tracks returns with more well prepared information on how he threw away all of his trademark film technique out for a much looser style seen in ‘The Mist.’ Hear it all here.” —filmschoolthrucommentaries: Frank Darabont on filmmaking – Part 3 & 4

In the two previous parts: “The man behind the camera of the classic ‘Shawshank Redemption’ illuminates us noobs on the craft of filmmaking. He talks about such topics as directing, narration, sound design, set design, camera technique amongst other topics. Oh, and did you ever wonder about who Allen Greene was and why Frank Darabont dedicated Shawshank Redemption to him? Listen below and find out.” —Frank Darabont on filmmaking

“If I’m any example, it took me nine years of starving, struggling and honing my craft before I started making my living as a writer. Those were lean years, too, believe me. But in the nine years since then, I haven’t stopped working. I consider myself very lucky, but I also believe you can make your own luck by applying the elbow grease of determination and effort, by nurturing a persistent belief in yourself no matter how bleak your chances seem (this philosophy lurks at the very heart of ‘The Shawshank Redemption,’ and is one of the main reasons I fell in love with King’s story).

My standard joke — actually, I’m fairly serious — is that there are potentially more talented writers and directors than I working in shoe stores and Burger Kings across the nation; the difference is I was willing to put in the nine years of effort and they weren’t. More to the point, it took Thomas Edison a thousand attempts before he got that damn light bulb to turn on. Imagine if he’d gotten discouraged enough to quit after only nine hundred and ninety nine tries. The message here is simple, and John F. Kennedy said it best: “We choose to go to the moon not because it is easy, but because it is hard.” Rough translation? If you have a dream, get up off your ass and start putting one foot in front of the other. Me, I’ll take Kennedy and Edison over Beavis and Butt-head any old day.” —Memo from the Trenches by Frank Darabont
“How bad do you want it? Frank Darabont went through it all, can you? Go and do likewise gents.” —Frank Darabont on a career in film

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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More filmmaking wisdom from Frank Darabont: “The man who is known for spending multiple sessions actually recording his commentary tracks returns with more well prepared information on how he threw away all of his trademark film technique out for a much looser style seen in ‘The Mist.’ Hear it all here.” filmschoolthrucommentaries: Frank Darabont on filmmaking – Part 3 & 4

In the two previous parts: “The man behind the camera of the classic ‘Shawshank Redemption’ illuminates us noobs on the craft of filmmaking. He talks about such topics as directing, narration, sound design, set design, camera technique amongst other topics. Oh, and did you ever wonder about who Allen Greene was and why Frank Darabont dedicated Shawshank Redemption to him? Listen below and find out.” Frank Darabont on filmmaking

“If I’m any example, it took me nine years of starving, struggling and honing my craft before I started making my living as a writer. Those were lean years, too, believe me. But in the nine years since then, I haven’t stopped working. I consider myself very lucky, but I also believe you can make your own luck by applying the elbow grease of determination and effort, by nurturing a persistent belief in yourself no matter how bleak your chances seem (this philosophy lurks at the very heart of ‘The Shawshank Redemption,’ and is one of the main reasons I fell in love with King’s story).

My standard joke — actually, I’m fairly serious — is that there are potentially more talented writers and directors than I working in shoe stores and Burger Kings across the nation; the difference is I was willing to put in the nine years of effort and they weren’t. More to the point, it took Thomas Edison a thousand attempts before he got that damn light bulb to turn on. Imagine if he’d gotten discouraged enough to quit after only nine hundred and ninety nine tries. The message here is simple, and John F. Kennedy said it best: “We choose to go to the moon not because it is easy, but because it is hard.” Rough translation? If you have a dream, get up off your ass and start putting one foot in front of the other. Me, I’ll take Kennedy and Edison over Beavis and Butt-head any old day.” Memo from the Trenches by Frank Darabont

“How bad do you want it? Frank Darabont went through it all, can you? Go and do likewise gents.” Frank Darabont on a career in film

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Founded in 2000, the DGA’s Visual History Program has conducted more than 160 interviews with directors and director’s team members discussing their careers and creative processes in film, television and other media. The mission of the DGA Visual History Program is to provide DGA members, entertainment industry professionals, educators, students and researchers the opportunity to explore the art and craft of film and television production through the career recollections and reflections of directors and director’s team members, including assistant directors, unit production managers, associate directors and stage managers. By means of in-depth interviews, the collection also offers historical documentation of the evolution of the craft, as well as the history and contributions of the Directors Guild as a social institution for peer interaction, support, and representation of its members’ creative concerns.
Robert Altman is admired as one of the most adventurous and influential American directors of his time, a filmmaker whose iconoclastic career spanned more than five decades of writing and directing in both film and television
Multihyphenate filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich (‘The Last Picture Show,’ ‘Paper Moon’) shares stories from his long career as a director, writer, producer and actor during the ‘New Hollywood’ era

Robert Benton discusses his journey from screenwriting to directing in films like ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ (1967), ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ (1979), and ‘Nobody’s Fool’ (1994). Benton also describes what he learned about working with a cast from actors like Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep, and Paul Newman
Greek-born, naturalized French director Costa-Gavras (‘Z,’ ‘Missing’) discusses his long filmmaking career directing critically acclaimed political and social thrillers. Gavras shares his inspirations for his most well-known films, his working relationships with producers, and where the ‘dash’ in his name originated

As both a writer and director, Jules Dassin was known for his noir films, ‘Thieves’ Highway’ (1949), ‘Brute Force’ (1947) and ‘The Naked City’ (1948), as well as two influential heist films, ‘Rififi’ (1955) and ‘Topkapi’ (1964). He also directed ‘Never on a Sunday’ (1960), which he wrote, produced and starred in alongside his future wife, Melina Mercouri
Miloš Forman was born in Czechoslovakia and grew up during World War II and the era of Soviet domination of his country. He studied screenwriting at the Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts in Prague

Cult classic director Monte Hellman (‘Two-Lane Blacktop,’ ‘The Shooting,’ ‘Ride in the Whirlwind’) discusses his long career directing horror films and westerns and everything in between
Walter Hill talks with Robert Markowitz about starting out as a second assistant director and screenwriter, pursuing his interest in genre films, working with Sam Peckinpah and John Huston, and his first directing job on ‘Hard Times’ with Charles Bronson

Barry Levinson (‘Rain Man,’ ‘The Natural,’ ‘Diner’) reflects on his first big break on the local Los Angeles comedy show, ‘Lohman and Barkley,’ his early apprenticeship with Mel Brooks as a writer, and his working methods and philosophy, including the importance of improvisation on the set
Jerry Lewis shares his unique perspective of the directing side of more than seven decades working in comedy as a director, writer, producer and performer

Sidney Lumet began his career acting and directing for the theater, and made his screen acting debut in the movie, ‘One Third of a Nation,’ in 1939. This interview was conducted on January 13 and 15, 2004
Indie filmmaker John Sayles began his career writing short stories and novels until he became interested in screenplays and, as a sample to show an agent, adapted the novel ‘Eight Men Out’ into a script (which he eventually directed in 1988)

French director Agnès Varda (‘La Pointe Courte,’ ‘Cléo from 5 to 7,’ ‘The Beaches of Agnès’) discusses her long career creating documentaries, features, and mixtures of the two that pre-dated and inspired several film movements of European cinema
Acclaimed director and cinematographer Haskell Wexler (‘Medium Cool,’ ‘Latino’), discusses what it takes from both roles to bring excellence to features and documentaries
At age nineteen, Robert Wise parlayed his early interest in film into a job in the RKO sound department. Later, he worked as an editor on films like ‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame,’ starring Charles Laughton
Full List of Visual History Interview Collection

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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Founded in 2000, the DGA’s Visual History Program has conducted more than 160 interviews with directors and director’s team members discussing their careers and creative processes in film, television and other media. The mission of the DGA Visual History Program is to provide DGA members, entertainment industry professionals, educators, students and researchers the opportunity to explore the art and craft of film and television production through the career recollections and reflections of directors and director’s team members, including assistant directors, unit production managers, associate directors and stage managers. By means of in-depth interviews, the collection also offers historical documentation of the evolution of the craft, as well as the history and contributions of the Directors Guild as a social institution for peer interaction, support, and representation of its members’ creative concerns.

Full List of Visual History Interview Collection

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 19

1998 DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Francis Ford Coppola was the subject of the Guild’s 75th Anniversary event on March 26, 2011. Coppola, the winner of two DGA Feature Film Awards (‘The Godfather’ and ‘The Godfather Part II’) and multiple nominations (‘The Conversation’; ‘Apocalypse Now’; ‘The Godfather Part III’) was honored at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles. As a producer, Coppola worked to provide young independent filmmakers freedom from studio interference. He was also a pioneer of technological filmmaking advances like pre-visualization, word processing for screenplays, electronic editing and experimentation with high definition. “Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most influential and innovative filmmakers of our time,” said DGA President Taylor Hackford in his welcome. “His work has helped shape contemporary cinema around the world.”

Coppola was joined onstage by directors Paul Thomas Anderson (‘There Will Be Blood’), Catherine Hardwicke (‘Red Riding Hood’) and David O. Russell (‘The Fighter’), for a conversation about the impact his films had on their own careers and others of their generation. Each of the directors presented clips from Coppola’s work to form the basis of their conversation. 75th Anniversary Advisory Committee Chair Michael Apted served as moderator. “Francis’ influence lies not only in the awards he’s won or the films he’s directed, but also in the example he’s set for young directors,” said Apted. Ever humble, the legendary director attributed much of his success to his creative collaborators. “Film is an ensemble,” said Coppola. “You’re the ringleader, but hopefully you have all of this wonderful work coming out of people whom you inspire, but also inspire you.” —The Impact of Francis Ford Coppola on the Next Generation, A DGA 75th Anniversary Event
Click on image below for full video coverage of the DGA 75th Anniversary event honoring Francis Ford Coppola (1:29:57).

A special thanks to Jog Road Productions. Be sure to check out their YouTube channel for more interviews with filmmakers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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1998 DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Francis Ford Coppola was the subject of the Guild’s 75th Anniversary event on March 26, 2011. Coppola, the winner of two DGA Feature Film Awards (‘The Godfather’ and ‘The Godfather Part II’) and multiple nominations (‘The Conversation’; ‘Apocalypse Now’; ‘The Godfather Part III’) was honored at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles. As a producer, Coppola worked to provide young independent filmmakers freedom from studio interference. He was also a pioneer of technological filmmaking advances like pre-visualization, word processing for screenplays, electronic editing and experimentation with high definition. “Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most influential and innovative filmmakers of our time,” said DGA President Taylor Hackford in his welcome. “His work has helped shape contemporary cinema around the world.”

Coppola was joined onstage by directors Paul Thomas Anderson (‘There Will Be Blood’), Catherine Hardwicke (‘Red Riding Hood’) and David O. Russell (‘The Fighter’), for a conversation about the impact his films had on their own careers and others of their generation. Each of the directors presented clips from Coppola’s work to form the basis of their conversation. 75th Anniversary Advisory Committee Chair Michael Apted served as moderator. “Francis’ influence lies not only in the awards he’s won or the films he’s directed, but also in the example he’s set for young directors,” said Apted. Ever humble, the legendary director attributed much of his success to his creative collaborators. “Film is an ensemble,” said Coppola. “You’re the ringleader, but hopefully you have all of this wonderful work coming out of people whom you inspire, but also inspire you.” —The Impact of Francis Ford Coppola on the Next Generation, A DGA 75th Anniversary Event

Click on image below for full video coverage of the DGA 75th Anniversary event honoring Francis Ford Coppola (1:29:57).

A special thanks to Jog Road Productions. Be sure to check out their YouTube channel for more interviews with filmmakers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ is a 2006 documentary directed and produced by Sophie Fiennes, scripted and presented by Slavoj Žižek. It explores a number of films from a psychoanalytic theoretical perspective. “‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ takes the viewer on an exhilarating ride through some of the greatest movies ever made. Serving as presenter and guide is the charismatic Slavoj Žižek, acclaimed philosopher and psychoanalyst. With his engaging and passionate approach to thinking, Žižek delves into the hidden language of cinema, uncovering what movies can tell us about ourselves. Whether he is untangling the famously baffling films of David Lynch, or overturning everything you thought you knew about Hitchcock, Žižek illuminates the screen with his passion, intellect, and unfailing sense of humour. ‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ cuts its cloth from the very world of the movies it discusses; by shooting at original locations and from replica sets it creates the uncanny illusion that Žižek is speaking from ‘within’ the films themselves. Together the three parts construct a compelling dialectic of ideas.”

Needless to say, it’s a must-have on your shelf. ‘The Pervert’s Guide’ is self-distributed by P Guide Ltd. The DVD of the documentary is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ is a 2006 documentary directed and produced by Sophie Fiennes, scripted and presented by Slavoj Žižek. It explores a number of films from a psychoanalytic theoretical perspective. “‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ takes the viewer on an exhilarating ride through some of the greatest movies ever made. Serving as presenter and guide is the charismatic Slavoj Žižek, acclaimed philosopher and psychoanalyst. With his engaging and passionate approach to thinking, Žižek delves into the hidden language of cinema, uncovering what movies can tell us about ourselves. Whether he is untangling the famously baffling films of David Lynch, or overturning everything you thought you knew about Hitchcock, Žižek illuminates the screen with his passion, intellect, and unfailing sense of humour. ‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ cuts its cloth from the very world of the movies it discusses; by shooting at original locations and from replica sets it creates the uncanny illusion that Žižek is speaking from ‘within’ the films themselves. Together the three parts construct a compelling dialectic of ideas.”

Needless to say, it’s a must-have on your shelf. ‘The Pervert’s Guide’ is self-distributed by P Guide Ltd. The DVD of the documentary is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Apr 18

One of our favorite graphic designers and go-to’s for inspiration, Midnight Marauder, has created an online poster exhibition celebrating maverick film director Robert Altman and his films.
“The purpose of this exhibition was to pay homage to Altman the man and Altman the filmmaker. Working on his vast body of Films in the old traditions of some of my favorite poster designers. Some of my biggest Influences as a designer have come from the Eastern European (Polish, Czech and German) posters of the 50s, 60s and 70s. Artists such as Hans Hillman, Isolde Monson-Baumgat, Karel Vaca and Roman Cieslewicz just to name a few. It is with that in mind that I have worked on over 50 + posters for this project. Carefully picking the right colors, fonts and composition was crucial for this project to succeed. Focusing on Altmans’ many lively characters and Themes, jumping from genres to genres was a big challenge. I wanted to be limited with my resources, not relying on film stills all the way. Thinking outside the box was very important, but not over doing it was equally important.
Along the way I learned a lot about Altman the man, his passion for filmmaking was enormous and his many troubles with the Hollywood Studio system. His love for his many different acting troupes, his Dailies that were opened to pretty much anybody, have become legendary. His failures and flops, turned into cult classics and masterpieces. Ultimately he lived to fight another fight. He had amazing support from his colleagues, close friends and producers, but especially his wife Katryn Altman and his family.” —Midnight Marauder







For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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One of our favorite graphic designers and go-to’s for inspiration, Midnight Marauder, has created an online poster exhibition celebrating maverick film director Robert Altman and his films.

“The purpose of this exhibition was to pay homage to Altman the man and Altman the filmmaker. Working on his vast body of Films in the old traditions of some of my favorite poster designers. Some of my biggest Influences as a designer have come from the Eastern European (Polish, Czech and German) posters of the 50s, 60s and 70s. Artists such as Hans Hillman, Isolde Monson-Baumgat, Karel Vaca and Roman Cieslewicz just to name a few. It is with that in mind that I have worked on over 50 + posters for this project. Carefully picking the right colors, fonts and composition was crucial for this project to succeed. Focusing on Altmans’ many lively characters and Themes, jumping from genres to genres was a big challenge. I wanted to be limited with my resources, not relying on film stills all the way. Thinking outside the box was very important, but not over doing it was equally important.

Along the way I learned a lot about Altman the man, his passion for filmmaking was enormous and his many troubles with the Hollywood Studio system. His love for his many different acting troupes, his Dailies that were opened to pretty much anybody, have become legendary. His failures and flops, turned into cult classics and masterpieces. Ultimately he lived to fight another fight. He had amazing support from his colleagues, close friends and producers, but especially his wife Katryn Altman and his family.” —Midnight Marauder

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

John Waters and David Lynch meet outside of Bob’s Big Boy restaurant in Los Angeles, 1979.
“Lynch had been with John Waters earlier on the day of the interview and almost got him to join us. David later provided me with a copy of his short film ‘The Amputee,’ also shot by Elmes, which we screened following the interview on one TV set outside on the UCLA campus — a world premier. The interview ends on one of the great lines from David Lynch, who said he wasn’t interested in Hollywood stars at the time: ‘If you’re going into the netherworld, you don’t want to go in with Chuck Heston.’” —Tom Christie

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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John Waters and David Lynch meet outside of Bob’s Big Boy restaurant in Los Angeles, 1979.

“Lynch had been with John Waters earlier on the day of the interview and almost got him to join us. David later provided me with a copy of his short film ‘The Amputee,’ also shot by Elmes, which we screened following the interview on one TV set outside on the UCLA campus — a world premier. The interview ends on one of the great lines from David Lynch, who said he wasn’t interested in Hollywood stars at the time: ‘If you’re going into the netherworld, you don’t want to go in with Chuck Heston.’” Tom Christie

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

(Source: thelongwalkalone)

Apr 17

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From the archives at UNZ.org: How John Huston Beats the Hollywood Odds by Gregg Kilday in The Saturday Review, January 1981.
“Film critic Andrew Sarris, who once dismissed Huston for ‘coasting on his reputation as a wronged individual with an alibi for every bad movie,’ took the occasion of last year’s American Film Society tribute to Huston to write, ‘What I have always tended to underestimate in Huston was how deep in his guts he could feel the universal experience of pointlessness and failure.’ John Huston still doesn’t like to admit that he works very hard. And in between visitors and phone calls at the Beverly Hills Hotel, he talks about heading back to Mexico for a stay before he has to settle down to complete the final cut of ‘Escape to Victory’ and begin all the preproduction meetings on ‘Annie.’ But although he cultivates his standing as a grasshopper, he is as shrewd as any ant. Actor Dennis Morgan once said of Huston, ‘John, I think, wrote his life as a script when he was very young, and he has played it ever since.’”
For more, see our archive under the tag, “John Huston.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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From the archives at UNZ.org: How John Huston Beats the Hollywood Odds by Gregg Kilday in The Saturday Review, January 1981.

“Film critic Andrew Sarris, who once dismissed Huston for ‘coasting on his reputation as a wronged individual with an alibi for every bad movie,’ took the occasion of last year’s American Film Society tribute to Huston to write, ‘What I have always tended to underestimate in Huston was how deep in his guts he could feel the universal experience of pointlessness and failure.’ John Huston still doesn’t like to admit that he works very hard. And in between visitors and phone calls at the Beverly Hills Hotel, he talks about heading back to Mexico for a stay before he has to settle down to complete the final cut of ‘Escape to Victory’ and begin all the preproduction meetings on ‘Annie.’ But although he cultivates his standing as a grasshopper, he is as shrewd as any ant. Actor Dennis Morgan once said of Huston, ‘John, I think, wrote his life as a script when he was very young, and he has played it ever since.’”

For more, see our archive under the tag, “John Huston.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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